Diversity and inclusion

A legal practitioner shares some of her diversity story and encourages further conversations to prompt positive change within the legal profession.
Can a world exist where employees don’t fear speaking out or speaking up? In the current climate, this isn’t the case and the fear is very real.
Lauren Phelps
Some years ago I found myself on a panel reviewing applications from law students for summer clerkship positions in a law firm. As we worked through the amazing applications from outstanding students, I began to seriously question my credentials for the role.
Fiona Yeang
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are disproportionately and systemically oppressed by the justice system. I wanted to utilise the privileges I have in accessing tertiary education to gain qualifications in an area where I can become an advocate for, and empower, my people.
Sheetal Deo
Whether to conceal or disclose to an employer that you are disabled is a dilemma faced by many - do you "come out" as a person with a disability or not?
Fiona Yeang
The guide, created by the members of the QLS Diverse Abilities Network, includes a list of simple measures that may assist people with diverse abilities who frequent or visit your workplace and in doing so, assist you in providing a more inclusive workplace.
Sheetal Deo
An honest and raw perspective from a practitioner who refuses to let anything bring him down.
Oliver Collins
Mid last year I had to ask my boss if I could work from home a couple of days a week. I was feeling exhausted and starting to struggle physically. I felt like I was failing and giving into my disease, and I hated it. Turns out my boss was completely supportive and accommodating. Really, that’s what working with a disability is all about – transparency on both sides.
Lexi Kehl
I am not totally blind, I am legally blind. There is a difference. The definitive classification is having a visual acuity of 6/60.
Ashleigh DoRozario

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