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FLC: Support, socialisation and future-shaping

Smiling woman looking away from camera

Jade Briani Hopper smashed her way through her Law degree while playing professional tennis, but decided to hang her racket up in 2011 after competing in the Australian Open.

With a unique background of arts, communication and marketing, Jade’s legal journey began in-house abroad in Europe. But a taste of vegemite and meat pies was too much to resist and Jade returned home to be admitted as a lawyer in Australia.

“When I lived in Europe, I didn’t have the opportunity to develop my Australian legal network as other people did through Uni, so I realised I needed to find a way to connect with like-minded professionals,” Jade says.

Now based in Melbourne, Jade practises family and commercial law in a boutique law firm. She says one of the biggest keys to her success has been joining the Law Institute of Victoria’s Young Lawyer Committee. Last year, she became the committee’s Vice-President.

“It was so good to meet people who understood me professionally and personally through this committee. In the legal profession, you need people who can support, challenge you and motivate you to acquire the myriad of proficiencies needed to be a successful lawyer.

It’s also a great way to socialise remotely – especially during the crazy year that has been 2020!”

On the 14th of September, nominations open for the first Queensland committee empowering the next generation of lawyers. The Future Leaders Committee (FLC) election not only raises the voice of emerging lawyers, but it also provides an appropriate platform to advocate change, with the full support of the existing QLS Council.

After her positive experience, Jade is encouraging anyone eligible to get in and have a go.

“The legal profession often takes a conservative approach to change, but our generation is the first to have lived with unprecedented access and exposure to technology,” she says.

“This generation is so ready to take the reins and make the most of their unique skillset and really make a change.

“I think everyone should give it ago because we have the potential to influence the profession in ways people cannot even imagine … but definitely need in a constantly changing world.”

Help shape the future of the legal profession. Find out more at about the Future Leaders Committee election:  www.qls.com.au/FLCelection

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